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20130113
20130113
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
was a last-minute deal to raise the debt ceiling in exchange for automatic cuts that were to take place at the end of 2012. you know those, as the sequester, which i've said many times, is a stupid name for a stupid thing that only washington could come up with. big surprise, with those sequester cuts, by the way, washington gave themselves another extension, two more months, so march 1st, america has another cliff to worry about going over. these people are really worse than a fourth grade flunkie who why not write to your constituents sand say, sorry that dog ate my homework. the mangy dog has been the american political process. america's chief export seems to be economic uncertainty. incredibly that only seems to be getting worse, what's the likelihood of this changing. >> when you have the mini cliffs ahead of us and seeing ugly politics in the next few weeks and months this might be capitulation, right? this might be this moment where you're going to see the system thrashing around, getting through this, and the optimist in see says after that you're going to have deficit reductio
or so. the president has too deal with the debt ceiling. he wants to pass major immigration reform. >> absolutely. >> chris: do something about climate change. has he told you how much political capital he is willing to spend on what is going to be a very tough fight? >> i think that the president has demonstrated tremendous leadership on this issue. i think the country rallied around him and h his leadership because he really was a voice for the parents who lost a child. >> chris: has he told you how much -- >> and i see from his actions and we hear from the white house and we hear from the vice president that they are going to lay down political capital on the issue and i think the one thing i would say to those people like larry and others who said we can't do anything about these issues is that whether it comes from the background checks or dealing with high capacity magazines which was the issue in newtown we can take action and to say that we should do nothing really doesn't respond to those parents in newtown who lost children in this horrible tragedy. >> chris: thank you bo
of these issues. trying to avert the debt ceiling debate by invoking the 14th amendment, cementing dosh minting the trillion dollar coin -- do you think those are viable options, would you be opposed to them being used? , i don't believe anyone should hold the -- >> i don't believe anyone should hold the american people ransom for what they could not get done in the ballot box. paying for our debts in the past -- for things we did, we borrowed money. republicans and democrats alike past these budgets -- passed these budgets. in our publicans are saying they don't want to pay for the things they voted for -- now republicans are saying they don't want to pay for things they voted for in past budget. to allow them to put conditions on the balance deal by saying we are going to ask for a ransom, devastating cuts to social security and medicare, in order to cover costs for things like the bush tax cuts, unpaid wars in iraq and afghanistan -- i agree with the president. the american people should not be held hostage with this game of using the debt ceiling as a way to try to extract what you could no
of these issues, you know, in washington. the debt ceiling fight that's on the horizon. is this going to impact the broad economy in the earning season, do you think? >> i guess this whole political thing is these are all the bricks in the wall of worry that equity markets are continuing to climb. you know, we know how to talk about these things, they're out there, in the media a lot. we follow them sometimes like a sport. maybe we exaggerate a little bit how much these political match nations, i don't want to minimize them but i think sometimes we miss the point that there are really good companies out there who figured out how to make really good money with all of this political noise going on. >> and yet, greg, so many potholes ahead. you know we're going to see a lot of back and forth over raising the debt ceiling, sequestration is still on the horizon now. less than two months away. the continuing resolution. i want you to take a listen to the president's spokesperson this week on the debt ceiling and get your reaction to that. >> sure. >> he will not negotiate with congress when it comes
discussed is trying to avert the debt ceiling debate by either invoking the 14th amendment, minting a $1 trillion coin. what do you think about those? do you think those are viable options and would you be opposed to them? >> i don't believe that anyone should hold the american people hostage for a ranssome that they couldn't get in the ballot box. and that's what we see being done with the whole issue of the debt ceiling. for things we did we borrowed money. in fact, republicans and democrats alike passed these budgets and now republicans are saying they don't want to pay for the thing that is they voted for in these previous budgets. that to me is not the way you run government once again and to allow someone to play political mischief, to put preconditions on a balanced deal by saying we're going to ask for a ransom devastating cuts to social security and medicare, in order to cover costs to things like the bush tax cuts, unpaid for wars in iraq and afghanistan don't make sense. so i agree with the president. the american people should not be held hostage with this game of using the d
about the confirmation hearing issues and then the fiscal, the debt ceiling which is fast approaching as well. >> definitely that dance card is getting filled up pretty quickly so early in the year and he hasn't even been inaugurated. also in that article, senator marco rubio preparing his own version of the d.r.e.a.m. act. he discussed how republicans could face some pushback from latinos because of their stance on immigration reform. he said this, quote. we are going to have a struggle speaking to a whole segment of the population about our principles of limited government and free enterprise if they think we don't want them here, alluding to those who might benefit from the d.r.e.a.m. act. so republicans have their own pr campaign to conduct with latinos on immigration reform, but how is the president going to combat republicans who want to see a more piece meal approach as we move forward here? >> reporter: i think we've seen the way the president has handled other recent challenges from his republican opposition when you consider just the fiscal cliff hanger as it were with campa
to add the 14th amendment to have the president do something to avert this curious problem with the debt ceiling. they don't agree with either of those two approaches because those two approaches have a role for the president and they say the president has no role here. it's all congress dealing with bills they've already i mean spending they've already done. that's the difference in posture. >> schieffer: do you think that the big fight is going to be over whether to raise the debt celling or over the so quealdso-called scwels if you sequester and that is to avoid these cuts in the program. >> there's a big fight among republicans about this because the debt celling is more powerful because the pain is if we blow the debt ceiling is real. for some republicans because the pain is so big -- >> schieffer: what would be the impact on the defense department, rajiv, if the cuts goes into effect. >> it takes us back to level of defense spending we had back in 2006 and 07. it's far more than we're spending in 2001. yes, there will be jobs furloughed, there will be weapons system but we won't
to a deal. next, john from tennessee. caller: good morning. i am calling about the debt ceiling. yes, it does need to be raised. because we have to pay our bills. if the government is allowed to borrow money and set their circumstances, then why is the private business sector not allowed to do that? the federal reserve has been shut down as far as to the bankers, as far as the this man being able to borrow money. the industry in the united states needs money to operate on and and. we need to be able to borrow money. if his mrs. are not allowed to expand and grow, how do they expect to pay the us -- these debts down the road? get these guys out of here. they do not need to be making a lifetime commitment. they have gotten old and senile and did not even know where they are. it is a shame that our government has gone this far. it is just terrible. host: thank you for the call. if you're just joining us, or listening on c-span radio, thank you for joining us. the question we are asking is whether or not you think the president can bypass congress to raise the debt ceiling. you can join
at the end of the year, and they're going to use the debt ceiling as their leverage. and interesting -- one interesting thing to watch for in all this is how the republican leaders in congress handle this because there are -- the republican leaders don't want a huge fight over the debt ceiling. but the rank-and-file members do. so how they navigate that is going to have a huge impact on how this plays out, but it's going to be a tremendous fight. and the idea that the president's going to not get to negotiate over the debt ceiling, it's not going to happen. >> well, to that end, what carol's saying, david, there are some in the gop who have suggested a partial government shutdown may be needed to get the spending cuts that they want. do you think that's where we're headed? >> well, i think it's very possible. if you look at how the fiscal cliff played out, as carol noted, republicans didn't get a number of things they were shooting for on their end. so politically, as well as substantively, the fiscal cliff, the debt ceiling i should say, then becomes their next avenue for being able to ext
in defense and defense budgeting with various debt ceiling deals, averted sequestration or not averted sequestration, this is a very timely period to be having this conversation. we are joined by a fantastic panel of experts to help us cut trees some of this confusion. and pull back and look at some of the bigger strategic questions out there. i'm joined by three folks. the senior fellow and director of research here at brookings institution. he is one the most prolific voices in this issue and has written hundreds of articles, including one on foreignpolicy.com right now. his most recent book includes opportunity, why nuclear arms is still important and the wounded giant, america's armed forces in an age of austerity. the larger and by one of the top thinkers and teachers in the field of security studies. he is a professor at columbia in university. his numerous books have garnered critical success from the american political science association for the best book in political science. he is also a key facilitator of a facility studies workshop. he has a great deal of experience in the
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)